Lorraine Turner Quilts for the Animals

In one week, the Houston International Quilt Market and Festival will begin. Quilt art beyond your wildest imagination by modern masters, many of whom will also be in attendance, will be there.  A 26-piece collection by Lorraine Turner, textile artist extraordinaire will be hanging in the great hall of quilts, and if you can, you must go see it.

 Lorraine Turner

Lorraine Turner

Lorraine Turner comes from a long line of stitchers, going all the way back to her great grandparents in 1860, a tailor and a costume maker for opera stars.  Lorraine, an artist in her own right, became an Emmy award winner early in her career as a graphic designer.  It wasn’t until 2016 that she began working with textiles as an art medium.

  A Second Glance   “It is a remarkable thing to have animals appear in daily meditations. Some come and just look at me, others preen showing off their beauty, and some feel as if they are coming to bring me insight. This wise Eagle owl approached me as a teacher and I felt mesmerized by his eyes. I was reminded to stop and remember there are many sides to a story. If I am not careful I will miss the importance of viewing life from all angles. I may not be seeing things as clearly as I think and I need to accept this humbly. His message of “letting go,” of the past really struck home and I am trying my best to move forward with a new attitude. This art will support the Seaside Seabird Sanctuary a non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing and rehabilitating sick, injured and orphaned wild birds.”  Techniques: Machine Embellished, free-motion embroidery, thread painting, raw appliqué Materials: Cotton, lace, tussah silk, and banana fibers  Original Art. Reference photo with permission by by FitzFotos

A Second Glance

“It is a remarkable thing to have animals appear in daily meditations. Some come and just look at me, others preen showing off their beauty, and some feel as if they are coming to bring me insight. This wise Eagle owl approached me as a teacher and I felt mesmerized by his eyes. I was reminded to stop and remember there are many sides to a story. If I am not careful I will miss the importance of viewing life from all angles. I may not be seeing things as clearly as I think and I need to accept this humbly. His message of “letting go,” of the past really struck home and I am trying my best to move forward with a new attitude. This art will support the Seaside Seabird Sanctuary a non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing and rehabilitating sick, injured and orphaned wild birds.”

Techniques: Machine Embellished, free-motion embroidery, thread painting, raw appliqué
Materials: Cotton, lace, tussah silk, and banana fibers
Original Art. Reference photo with permission by by FitzFotos

Lorraine’s art quilts are notable for her subject matter, and her unique technique.  Her quilts are brilliant representations of animals with which she has strong spiritual connections. She blends multiple fibers using needle felting to create the beautiful sheen of an animal’s coat.   The combination of her deep feelings for endangered animals, and her talent as an artist results in quilts that resonate emotion and sincerity.

  A Prince’s Haven   I began working with a lion sanctuary in South Africa. Lions are highly sought after by trophy hunters, and their numbers are dwindling. I was fortunate enough to visit and communicate directly with the lions that live within this protected preserve. I believe they are Master Teachers and are here to help mankind. During meditation communications, they encouraged me to use my art to help the entire animal kingdom, and to think of my hands as an expression of this kindred spirit relationship. We must be lion hearted when we face the uncertainties along our journey. The lions continue to communicate through meditations and this cub appeared in July 2018 with a message regarding protection. If we accept our role as guardians of this planet than we must begin to see the importance of working together to assure ALL of life will continue to survive. I sensed his need to explore yet his uncertainty regarding his future. His eyes held mine and I could feel this future King looking at me with hope. This art will benefit whitelions.org the sanctuary where I first met these magnificent cats.  Techniques: raw appliqué, free-motion embroidery, felting  Materials: Tussah silk, merino wool, banana silk, cotton Original art. Reference photo purchased from Shutterstock

A Prince’s Haven

I began working with a lion sanctuary in South Africa. Lions are highly sought after by trophy hunters, and their numbers are dwindling. I was fortunate enough to visit and communicate directly with the lions that live within this protected preserve. I believe they are Master Teachers and are here to help mankind. During meditation communications, they encouraged me to use my art to help the entire animal kingdom, and to think of my hands as an expression of this kindred spirit relationship. We must be lion hearted when we face the uncertainties along our journey. The lions continue to communicate through meditations and this cub appeared in July 2018 with a message regarding protection. If we accept our role as guardians of this planet than we must begin to see the importance of working together to assure ALL of life will continue to survive. I sensed his need to explore yet his uncertainty regarding his future. His eyes held mine and I could feel this future King looking at me with hope. This art will benefit whitelions.org the sanctuary where I first met these magnificent cats.

Techniques: raw appliqué, free-motion embroidery, felting
Materials: Tussah silk, merino wool, banana silk, cotton
Original art. Reference photo purchased from Shutterstock

The depth and dimension in Lorraine Turner’s artwork comes from her intimate relationship with the animals she depicts in her quilts.  Lorraine is an animal communicator who uses meditation to relate to her subjects. She says, “I work with a passion of purpose.  When you connect with your heart it really flows through the art.  I teach my students how to connect with the animals. Each one has a special connection.  Is it a male?  Is it a female?  I try to get them to feel the energy of the animals and their plight.”

  The Three Bankers   Meditation often brings me scenery that seems as if I am in wild action drama. I feel and hear what is shown to me. The urgency within the messages the wild horses of the Outer Banks convey is unmatched. They are a proud species overcoming centuries of harsh weather and their numbers are dwindling. They cannot gallop fast enough to escape the rising tides of Global warming and they speak of humanity’s need to share the land they roam. They prick their ears when I try to I assure them I am doing my best and I understand their struggles, but I am but one artist. This does not stop their thundering approach as they pound the shores and toss their heads to say, “we are a part of your community and if the water overtakes us it will overtake you.” Many volunteers work hard to try and protect these guardians of the sea, however they cannot do it all. The Bankers want us to join together as stewards of our planet to assure ALL offspring be it animal or human has a future. This art will benefit the non-profit organization Corolla Wild Horse Fund as they continue to aid these magnificent steeds.  Techniques: Wet-Felted, free-motion embroidery, hand embroidery, thread painting, raw appliqué Materials: Cotton, merino wool, lace, tussah silk, banana fibers, dyed silk floss, silk ribbons Original art. Reference photo with permission by by FitzFotos

The Three Bankers

Meditation often brings me scenery that seems as if I am in wild action drama. I feel and hear what is shown to me. The urgency within the messages the wild horses of the Outer Banks convey is unmatched. They are a proud species overcoming centuries of harsh weather and their numbers are dwindling. They cannot gallop fast enough to escape the rising tides of Global warming and they speak of humanity’s need to share the land they roam. They prick their ears when I try to I assure them I am doing my best and I understand their struggles, but I am but one artist. This does not stop their thundering approach as they pound the shores and toss their heads to say, “we are a part of your community and if the water overtakes us it will overtake you.” Many volunteers work hard to try and protect these guardians of the sea, however they cannot do it all. The Bankers want us to join together as stewards of our planet to assure ALL offspring be it animal or human has a future. This art will benefit the non-profit organization Corolla Wild Horse Fund as they continue to aid these magnificent steeds.

Techniques: Wet-Felted, free-motion embroidery, hand embroidery, thread painting, raw appliqué
Materials: Cotton, merino wool, lace, tussah silk, banana fibers, dyed silk floss, silk ribbons
Original art. Reference photo with permission by by FitzFotos

By trying to understand their plight on such a deep level, Lorraine is able to sincerely portray their beauty. Her quilts are not simply pictures of animals, but portraits of beauty, struggle, and survival, and the real relationships she feels we must all strive to develop with the animal kingdom.

  Adoration   Inspired by meditation I was shown and felt the deep connection of “motherhood,” and protection it embodies. This precious bond perpetuates survival, yet does not guarantee it. Mountain lions, storms and fights within the herd are a constant threat. I used delicate fibers such as banana fibers and lace to symbolize the uncertainty that awaits this colt. Tree motifs were incorporated to represent their strong family roots.  Techniques: Machine embellished, wet-felted, free-motion embroidery, raw appliqué, thread painting Materials: Cotton, lace, Merino wool, tussah silk, banana fibers, vintage doilies Original art. Photo reference with permission by Kent Keller

Adoration

Inspired by meditation I was shown and felt the deep connection of “motherhood,” and protection it embodies. This precious bond perpetuates survival, yet does not guarantee it. Mountain lions, storms and fights within the herd are a constant threat. I used delicate fibers such as banana fibers and lace to symbolize the uncertainty that awaits this colt. Tree motifs were incorporated to represent their strong family roots.

Techniques: Machine embellished, wet-felted, free-motion embroidery, raw appliqué, thread painting
Materials: Cotton, lace, Merino wool, tussah silk, banana fibers, vintage doilies
Original art. Photo reference with permission by Kent Keller

 “The earth belongs to all of us,” she says. “We all have to use it. We have to work together. We are a community.”


 For further information about Lorraine Turner’s work visit www.calicohorses.com, or, if at all possible, make your way to the Houston International Quilt Festival Nov 8-11, at the George R. Brown Convention Center

Sue FenwickComment